Baker Academic

Monday, March 2, 2015

“Finding Jesus” on CNN—Chris Keith

As something of a junky for Jesus documentaries, I was excited to be able to watch the first episode of CNN's "Finding Jesus" over lunch today.  The full episode is available online here.  It focuses on the phenomenon that is the Shroud of Turin but contains quite a bit of interaction with the Gospel texts.  Mark Goodacre, Candida Moss, Michael Peppard, Ben Witherington, and others make appearances.

13 comments:

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    1. I haven't used it as such, if that's what you're asking.

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  2. Excellent! I still hadn't figured out how to connect to these episodes on the "Son of Man - Son of God". Thanks for the link!

    The developing Far Eastern concept of "sanjiang", meaning three rivers, provides intriguing symbolism when promoted as the three essential paths to Heaven:

    1. Via the Son of Man (his teachings and guidance).
    2. Via men of religion (those who know God).
    3. Via men who know not God*.

    * Even this path is effective when we learn valuable lessons.

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    1. Yes, right, well, thanks for that Anonymous.

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  3. If confirming the Shroud of Turin, the Urantia revelation hints that the Shroud may be the first linen sheet used to wrap Jesus' body - not the sheet from Joseph's tomb:

    In Episode 1 of "Finding Jesus", the Shroud of Turin is the primary focus.

    While the Urantia Book's paragraph 190:1.2 (see below) describes the final disposal of the grave cloths ("over a near-by cliff"), these following quotes state that saturated bandages - not a single cloth - were directly next to Jesus' body. And, apparently, two different sheets are mentioned in the UB paragraphs; the linen sheet (over the bandages) which wrapped Jesus' body has been the focus for the Shroud of Turin mystery:

    "Joseph and Nicodemus had brought with them large quantities of myrrh and aloes, and they now wrapped the body with bandages saturated with these solutions. When the embalming was completed, they tied a napkin about the face, wrapped the body in a linen sheet, and reverently placed it on a shelf in the tomb." (188:1.4)

    "In the recess of stone where they had laid Jesus, Mary saw only the folded napkin where his head had rested and the bandages wherewith he had been wrapped lying intact and as they had rested on the stone before the celestial hosts removed the body. The covering sheet lay at the foot of the burial niche." (189.4.6)

    "for the high priest sent the captain of the temple guards to the tomb at half past seven o’clock to remove the grave cloths. The captain wrapped them all up in the linen sheet and threw them over a near-by cliff." (190:1.2)


    Thus, the image on the Shroud of Turin would have to reflect this ceremonial wrapping - it does not; the Shroud's image displays direct contact with a body (if this is what created the image). Seemingly, the Shroud is not authentic.

    However ... there's an intriguing possibility that a different linen sheet (see quote below) is the Shroud of Turin. For this bloodied linen sheet would not have been used in the ceremonial wrapping of Jesus' body at Joseph's tomb. What happened to this first sheet used to wrap Jesus?

    "At about half past four o’clock the burial procession of Jesus of Nazareth started from Golgotha for Joseph’s tomb across the way. The body was wrapped in a linen sheet as the four men carried it, followed by the faithful women watchers from Galilee." (188:1.3)

    Rather than solving the mystery of the Shroud of Turin, the UB's paragraphs present subtle intrigue!

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    1. The Shroud of Turin can be a good entertaining topic, but from a scientific standpoint it must be considered as a medieval artifact - although unique and very peculiar. Besides the technical (and, for some, controversial) aspects of radiocarbon dating, here's the link to a good historical analysis from an Italian researcher, published in English by Brill:
      https://www.academia.edu/8475824/From_the_Mandylion_of_Edessa_to_the_Shroud_of_Turin._The_Metamorphosis_and_Manipulation_of_a_Legend

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  4. Mark Goodacre's comments on the Shroud are already being challenged here:
    http://shroudstory.com/2015/03/05/mark-goodacre-answers-carbon-dating-questions-on-cnn-website/
    I think it would have been best if he had refrained from commenting on a subject in which he is not an expert.

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  5. Re: UB paragraph 188:1.3
    "The body was wrapped in a linen sheet as the four men carried it"

    The marks along the two sides of the Shroud might indicate how the four men carried Jesus' body. (using the sheet as a stretcher?)

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  6. Barrie Schwortz offers a good review here: http://www.shroud.com/pdfs/cnnreview.pdf

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  7. Re: "using the sheet as a stretcher"

    The marks along the two sides of the Shroud may indicate use of two spears (in addition to the linen sheet), such as thick Roman pilums.

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  8. Re: "using the sheet as a stretcher"

    Why would Joseph and Nicodemus have use of such spears?

    Consider this quote: "The Apostle John told about the crucifixion as he remembered the event two thirds of a century after its occurrence. The other records were based upon the recital of the Roman centurion on duty who, because of what he saw and heard, subsequently believed in Jesus and entered into the full fellowship of the kingdom of heaven on earth." (Urantia revelation 187:4.4)

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  9. Re: "using the sheet as a stretcher"

    More rationale about a centurion's spears:

    "At about half past four o’clock the burial procession of Jesus of Nazareth started from Golgotha for Joseph’s tomb across the way. The body was wrapped in a linen sheet as the four men carried it, followed by the faithful women watchers from Galilee. The mortals who bore the material body of Jesus to the tomb were: Joseph, Nicodemus, John, and the Roman centurion." (188:1.3)

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  10. Re: "using the sheet as a stretcher"

    "improvised blanket stretcher" is a good online search term.

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